Out of balance? Massage can help

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pc: The Art and Science of Kinesiology

I love this picture because it illustrates so clearly how muscular tightness can change the balance of your whole body! You can see that the shortened quadratus lumborum causes the pelvis to shift and the lumbar spine to become curved. This of course isn’t the end of it, because if your hips are out of whack, then your knees suffer as well.

So it turns into a whole body issue, just from one muscle! If you are a rider, the problem compounds. We all know that if you are sitting unevenly in the saddle, the best case scenario is that you are going to have a hard time using your seat to communicate with your horse. But worse, over time this uneven distribution of your weight over your horse’s back can also cause him to have a sore back, which can then go to his hips, then to stifles, hocks, and so on and so forth. You get the picture!

The point is, we can get ahead of these issues if we fix them before they get too far. Don’t let a minor muscular tightness turn into a whole body problem! Regular massage and PEMF therapy are the keys to staying loose and in balance!

Plantar Fasciitis

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WHAT IS PLANTAR FASCIITIS?🤔
The plantar fascia plays an important role in normal foot biomechanics. 🏃🏾The plantar fascia is firmly anchored to the calcaneus (heel bone) and extends forward as a thick band of longitudinally arranged connective tissue fibers. The fibers diverge and as they pass anteriorly, they form individual bands that enter the toes and connect with bones, ligaments and the skin.This fascia provides static support for the longitudinal arch of the foot and acts as a dynamic shock absorber.💪🏾 Plantar fasciitis is an overuse condition of the plantar fascia at its attachment to the calcaneus (heel bone), it is due to collagen disarray in the absence of inflammatory cells. 🤕Thus, the condition resembles that of tendinosis/tendinopathy and should be more correctly referred to as “plantar fasciosis” or “fasciopathy”. Individuals who have low arch (flat feet) or high arch feet have an increased risk of developing this condition. Plantar fasciitis is commonly associated with tightness in the calf, hamstring and gluteal region. Tightness in these areas can predispose to plantar fasciitis by altering the normal foot biomechanics.📖
Source: (4th Edition) Brukner & Khan’s Clinical Sports Medicine . and @physioosteogram
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If you suffer from plantar fasciitis, I can help! Massage and PEMF therapy have shown to be very effective at helping to reduce the pain and heal the tendons and fascia of the foot, as well as easing the muscular tightness that contributed to the condition in the first place!

Massage for people and horses!

How massage can benefit you:

There’s no denying the power of bodywork. Regardless of the adjectives we assign to it (pampering, rejuvenating, therapeutic) or the reasons we seek it out (a luxurious treat, stress relief, pain management), massage therapy can be a powerful ally in your healthcare regimen.

Experts estimate that upwards of ninety percent of disease is stress related. And perhaps nothing ages us faster, internally and externally, than high stress. While eliminating anxiety and pressure altogether in this fast-paced world may be idealistic, massage can, without a doubt, help manage stress. This translates into:

Decreased anxiety
Enhanced sleep quality
Greater energy
Improved concentration
Increased circulation
Reduced fatigue

Furthermore, clients often report a sense of perspective and clarity after receiving a massage. The emotional balance bodywork provides can often be just as vital and valuable as the more tangible physical benefits, such as:

Alleviating pain and improving range of motion
Helping athletes of any level prepare for, and recover from, strenuous workouts
Increasing joint flexibility
Relaxing and softening injured, tired, and overused muscles
Relieving migraine pain

 

How massage can benefit your horse:

 

Muscular pain is often a major cause of equine behavior and performance problems, but most people don’t even realize it when their horse has a muscular problem, and have no idea what to do about it!

 

To understand why we need to know more about muscles, we must realize that more than 60% of the horses body weight is muscle. Small muscle injuries can take up to 90 days to become apparent (by a change in attitude, decreased performance and lameness) by which time they may have caused more serious injury. Prompt attention to these ‘minor’ muscle injuries not only enhances a horse’s performance but also may prevent future problems. Muscle tightening is transmitted from one muscle group to another, so for example, shoulder tension may be transmitted to the muscles of the forearm, resulting in extra stress being placed on the tendons. Muscles may also enlarge with tension.

 

Equine massage can help to resolve many muscular problems, and can improve performance, by:

 

  • increasing flexibility
  • increasing range of motion
  • improving circulation
  • enhancing muscle tone
  • relaxing muscle spasms
  • preventing and relieving adhesions in muscles
  • releasing tension
  • aiding in mental relaxation